Health and Pension stamp cards and an Unemployment and Holiday card from 1940s



Health and Pension stamp cards and an Unemployment and Holiday card from 1940s

Following the introduction of the National Insurance Act in 1946, employers and employees were to contribute small amounts each week and this would then provide unemployment and sickness benefits, old age pensions and a number of other benefits (e.g. death grant) when they were needed; similar to any insurance scheme. In those early days before the system became computerised, each employee had a card which his/her employer kept and affixed a stamp on it each week to show the employee had made his/her contribution (the amount was deducted from wages). A new card was issued each financial year and the old card would be sent off to a benefits office so it could be recorded (the amount of pension paid used to depend on the number of years of NI you had paid). They are national documents but were used at a local level, although it’s curious that these refer to someone from Nottingham and haven’t been returned to the authorities at the end of a tax year. What’s interesting is that these cards are very early cards from the NI scheme which only came into force in 1946. In those early days before the system became computerised, each employee had a card which his/her employer kept and affixed a stamp on it each week to show the employee had made his/her contribution (the amount was deducted from wages). A new card was issued each financial year and the old card would be sent off to a benefits office so it could be recorded (the amount of pension paid used to depend on the number of years of NI you had paid). I think when you left one employer for another you took your stamped card with your P45 to your new employer. In my young days I remember workers talking about getting their ‘stamp’. As a student getting holiday jobs in the late 1960s I remember having my NI cards which I presumably sent off to the benefit office each year. So to answer your question. They are national documents that people had but used at a local level although it’s strange that these refer to someone from Nottingham and haven’t been returned to the authorities at the end of a tax year. What’s interesting is that they are very early cards from the NI scheme which has I have written only came into force in 1946. Following the recommendations of the Beveridge Report (1942), the Labour Govt revamped the National Insurance system by the National Insurance Act in 1946. It largely introduced the National Insurance system that still underlies the one we have today. Employers and employees were to contribute small amounts each week and this would then provide unemployment and sickness benefits, old age pensions and a number of other benefits (e.g. death grant) when they were needed; similar to any insurance scheme. In those early days before the system became computerised, each employee had a card which his/her employer kept and affixed a stamp on it each week to show the employee had made his/her contribution (the amount was deducted from wages). A new card was issued each financial year and the old card would be sent off to a benefits office so it could be recorded (the amount of pension paid used to depend on the number of years of NI you had paid). I think when you left one employer for another you took your stamped card with your P45 to your new employer. In my young days I remember workers talking about getting their ‘stamp’. As a student getting holiday jobs in the late 1960s I remember having my NI cards which I presumably sent off to the benefit office each year. So to answer your question. They are national documents that people had but used at a local level although it’s strange that these refer to someone from Nottingham and haven’t been returned to the authorities at the end of a tax year. What’s interesting is that they are very early cards from the NI scheme which has I have written only came into force in 1946. Following the recommendations of the Beveridge Report (1942), the Labour Govt revamped the National Insurance system by the National Insurance Act in 1946. It largely introduced the National Insurance system that still underlies the one we have today. Employers and employees were to contribute small amounts each week and this would then provide unemployment and sickness benefits, old age pensions and a number of other benefits (e.g. death grant) when they were needed; similar to any insurance scheme. In those early days before the system became computerised, each employee had a card which his/her employer kept and affixed a stamp on it each week to show the employee had made his/her contribution (the amount was deducted from wages). A new card was issued each financial year and the old card would be sent off to a benefits office so it could be recorded (the amount of pension paid used to depend on the number of years of NI you had paid). I think when you left one employer for another you took your stamped card with your P45 to your new employer. In my young days I remember workers talking about getting their ‘stamp’. As a student getting holiday jobs in the late 1960s I remember having my NI cards which I presumably sent off to the benefit office each year. So to answer your question. They are national documents that people had but used at a local level although it’s strange that these refer to someone from Nottingham and haven’t been returned to the authorities at the end of a tax year. What’s interesting is that they are very early cards from the NI scheme which has I have written only came into force in 1946. Following the recommendations of the Beveridge Report (1942), the Labour Govt revamped the National Insurance system by the National Insurance Act in 1946. It largely introduced the National Insurance system that still underlies the one we have today. Employers and employees were to contribute small amounts each week and this would then provide unemployment and sickness benefits, old age pensions and a number of other benefits (e.g. death grant) when they were needed; similar to any insurance scheme. In those early days before the system became computerised, each employee had a card which his/her employer kept and affixed a stamp on it each week to show the employee had made his/her contribution (the amount was deducted from wages). A new card was issued each financial year and the old card would be sent off to a benefits office so it could be recorded (the amount of pension paid used to depend on the number of years of NI you had paid). I think when you left one employer for another you took your stamped card with your P45 to your new employer. In my young days I remember workers talking about getting their ‘stamp’. As a student getting holiday jobs in the late 1960s I remember having my NI cards which I presumably sent off to the benefit office each year. So to answer your question. They are national documents that people had but used at a local level although it’s strange that these refer to someone from Nottingham and haven’t been returned to the authorities at the end of a tax year. What’s interesting is that they are very early cards from the NI scheme which has I have written only came into force in 1946. Employers and employees were to contribute small amounts each week and this would then provide unemployment and sickness benefits, old age pensions and a number of other benefits (e.g. death grant) when they were needed; similar to any insurance scheme.

Image related to item 2021.44
Image related to item 2021.44
Record number:2021.44
Simple name:health and pension stamp cards
Classification term:work and play
Period:20th century, early
Date:1940 1960
Associated organisation:British Goverment